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prohibiting the use of coffee and coca-cola -- cola in the world. this is a little over an hour as they discuss the invitation of its use worldwide. >> could please turn on that. thank you. we are going to be talking about coffee, and cola and the ingredients in cola. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths through much profit and how they make their way into the united states and what the u.s. government's role has been in ensuring that they come into this country. this evening, we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. without further ado, i would like to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i am so excited. it is great to be here in new york. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we will go into what focuses this week and what is going on with the u.n. that basically prohibits this around the world. back in 2004 and 2005, i did a book about marijuana. it wasn't about how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to t
attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
the tax code which everybody wants us to do. but also we have used a small percentage of that money to reduce the deficit. so it doesn't place too much burden on the operating structure of the country. >> so who is the one person in the white house and one person and the republican leadership who is most committed to making the tough choice because i think the one person in the white house is most authentically -- authentically committed to making is the president. i've met with him several times. i believe that he's willing to make these cuts in the entitlement programs that we have to make. that doesn't mean i don't want to continue to push them outside of his comfort zone to go a little further than you might want to go otherwise, but i think we're going to have to if we get a deal with republicans but again we'll have to push the republicans in order to do the tax reform, allows us to reduce the deficit in the same manner. >> how do you push a president? >> you know, the way i've done it is always candidly, open with him, not agree but tell them exactly what you think and why. t
. following the consequences of the drought last year, the president directed us to create a drought task force, made up of all federal agencies, to try to mitigate the impacts and effects of drought. that led us to begin thinking at usda about steps we can take to help producers during a difficult time. we took a series of steps to try to mitigate the consequences. we opened up crp land, and changed premium payments, things of that nation -- that nature. it also got us thinking -- were there other steps, other things we should be doing, to provide help and assistance? it occurred to us perhaps we should be focused more acutely on the need to encourage multi- cropping through the united states, in order for us to do a better job of conservation, to create biomass that could be a revenue source, and to potentially allow us to conserve precious water resources, which would in turn allow us to get through these drought circumstances in a more favorable circumstance. we have begun a process of looking at ways in which we could provide assistance. you will be fortunate to hear from a fellow by
address, john allen said the u.s. is winning the war in afghanistan. >> afghan forces defending afghan people and enabling the governments of this country to serve its citizens, this is victory. this is what winning looks like. we should not shrink from using these words. i've lived afghanistan will never again be a safe haven to terrorists -- i believe afghanistan will never again be a safe haven to terrorists and the scourge of the plague of the world. >> the obama administration plans to nominate alan to serve as the next supreme allied commander after he was cleared of misconduct in the scandal of the ousted david petraeus. israeli forces have dismantled a number -- another palestinian encampment challenging the settlement growth in the west bank. activists erected tents near have been saturday in a bid to protect their town. there were forcibly -- they were forcibly arrested. bahrain's government holding reconciliation talks about opposition parties for the first time in over a year. the negotiations last broke down in july 2011 after opposition groups accused the u.s.-backed mona
have come back to the market. can you tell us a little bit more about the structural economic reforms. particularly repairing the banking system, which i feel is the exemption of growth. >> yes, two years ago when the administration was elected, it actually lasted 250,000 jobs for the two years prior to that. reputation is in shreds around the world. our banks are dysfunctional. there is a complete sense of hopelessness and despair and disillusionment. now, gordon was elected with a very keen mind. we have a strategy and a plan that works. the banks are being recapitalize and restructured and have been back in the market as this program began in 2013. there are double-digit figures and our people have had to take really serious challenges. his government made really serious decisions or if it is an example of the government works and understands the patience of people, putting up with these changes in the greater picture of things. now, we expect to do better. but we cannot do without the collaboration of the committee of the colleagues in order to do that in 2013, and example of the
used was one of the best we had ever encountered. >> so mr. al-awlaki is by not an american citizen by where anyone in america would be proud? >> he was part of al qaeda, and it was his determination to kill americans on behalf of al qaeda. >> thank you. is it true that in the last four years the fbi has arrested 100 people, either planning, conspiring, or trying to commit a terrorist attack on this nation? >> yes, they have arrested a lot of people. >> that is because of good, sound intelligence. i think what people forget is that they will kill us if they can and it is extraordinarily difficult if you cannot get into where they were hiding. would it have been possible to have arrested mr. al-awlaki where he was in the yemen? >> we work very closely with yemenis to see if we can arrest individuals. if we can, we want to do that because it is valuable for us. any actions taken in concert with the yemeni government are done in terms of any types of strikes we might engage there with them, are done only because we do not have the ability to bring those individuals into custody. >> tha
use only might accumulated leave time for this birth, and i made arrangements to have the child adopted at birth. pregnancy was immoral and administrative grounds for discharge, and that was that. so susan was sent back to the west coast where she was represented by the aclu of the state of washington. they managed to stay or discard -- to stay for discharge month by month. she lost in district court. she lost in the ninth circuit, but with an excellent defense. [laughter] the supreme court took her case, and they then -- and then the solicitor general been the dean of the first law school i attended, he saw a real damage potential for the government in susan's case. so he convened the military brass and he said, that rule about pregnancy being an automatic grounds for discharge, that's not right for our time. you should immediately wave the captain's discharge and then change the regulation. for the future. and that's what happened. now, the law students know what that meant for our case. the government had given susan everything she was asking for, so the government then immed
that is the biggest window. that is not over populated by u.s. capacity and capability. it is not religious. it is a it is not religious. we can extend it as needed. it should make us be more urgent. we find that when we bring urgency to almost any discussion inside of the u.s. government is a constructive thing to do. >> there are a number of areas in the u.s. government that look at failed and failing state. the undersecretary for political affairs has that responsibility. dns see used to chair and -- the nsc used to chair a committee. how does cso play into this? >> we try to work with everyone that you mentioned. we want to be aggregators of talent and good work that has gone on. for example, something as simple as analytics, we have a metadata analyst in our shop now, but we want him to be an aggregator of aggregators. i keep saying you have to be made silver on steroids -- nate silver on steroids. we cannot run enough staff to review and it turns out the intelligence community loves being called by the state department. they are flattered by it. they want their wo
. testified about the attack thon u.s. consulate in benghazi, libarch that killed ambassador stevens and three other americans. the pentagon never received the request from the state academy for security, and did not have the resources to get support on the ground in time to thwart the attackers. leon panetta is stepping down. this hearing is four hours and 15 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. today the committee welcomes secretary of defense, leon panetta, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey. to testify about the department of defense's response the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya, last year. and the findings of its internal review following that attack, including lessons learned from benghazi. we will be receiving testimony next tuesday morning on the impact of sequestration and/or a full-year continuing resolution on the department of defense witnesses. there will be department secretary of defense, the comp driller and the joint chiefs of staff. i hope
for joining us and thanks for being with us. captioned by closed captioning services, inc. >> greta: , tonight, is washington a threat to americans? now, according to a new pugh poll the answer is, yes. a majority of americans saying washington poses a threat to their personal rights and freedoms. karl rove is here to talk about that plus much more ahead. "on the record" starts right now. >> the obama administration announcing big changes for the birth control coverage for employees of some religious organizations. >> we need to provide preventative services, access to preventative services for all women and that includes contraception and we also needed to respect religious beliefs. >> it would appear to be a dramatic post election reversal by the obama administration on an issue that marked a flash point in the early electoral cycle last year which by most accounts helped the campaign galvanize voters. >> january of 2009. 8.5 million americans have left the labor force. this administration is shrinking the private sector. >> when you look at that number it as pretty low number when you consi
as a u.s. senator from massachusetts. mr. president, i am proud to join my colleagues today in support of the violence against women act of 2013. i do so not just as a senator but as a mother of two daughters. this critical legislation has been held up for far too long, and it's past time for reauthorization. we have a serious responsibility to ensure that women and families are protected. the rates of violence and abuse in our country are astounding and totally unacceptable. according to a 2010c.d.c. study, domestic violence affects more than 12 million people each year. across the united states, 15 1/2 million children lives in homes in which domestic violence has occurred. and in my home state of north carolina alone, 73 women and children are killed on average every year because of domestic violence. let me say that number one more time. 73 women and children are killed every year due to domestic violence. these are alarming statistics, and we must act now to address them. since 1994, vawa programs, and in particular the stop program, that provides grants for services, training, of
their approach to the syrian conflict does something they could do to reassure the u.s. and the international community, it seems to be another clear implication of what you are saying is that the u.s. takes further steps to support the syrian opposition it would be read as strengthening their view that we are out to get them. >> we are out to get assaad. are we ipso facto out to get adirondacks -- to get iran? are we going to protect the allies, which is something i think we need to do despite the fact that they have a bad record? no one in syria has a sterling record, but it think we need to give them the opportunity to say there is a news syria forming. do they want to be engaged? what is the relationship there? i'm not very optimistic that we could get the iranians on board, but maybe you could find a way to make them increasingly less relevant. do they equate that with a regime change? maybe. we have to be aware of it. i think that's a stretch. i think the iranians could see, what i say is increasing value in the opportunity to talk if they begin to understand that the region is not movi
heightened security risk. and i think it's time for us to do a check on whether or not we should in fact be relying on in that local militia were contractors. >> senator, let me just commend you for the work you've been doing with regards to these kind of contract and the quality of individuals that are involved. .. to do what is inherit a government function. it's almost like a hit brick wall every i time talk about this. why is it it has to be a contract function. why can't we use the best trained military in the world to protect our most valued assets in our most dangerous places? >> i mean, i think the reality just speaking with regards to my old agency we are deployed in so many areas you can't expect the military to pop up there and provide that kind of protection. they have to get security on side and get from the very best people they can contract with. that's become the reality we're dealing with. >> because the need to integrate to the community and therefore if you have military it stands out. i can see that particularly under the intelligence agency. for embassies, it
are a citizen of the united states, you have become the enemy. i do not see anything wrong with using drone strikes to take them out. i just do not they have done a good job, i believe. host: what do you think? you should be in charge of the program and targeting american citizens? -- who should be in charge? caller: i do not believe it should be the department of defense. understanding there are several 1r ectives, one being 5240- there is the required targeting of citizens, targeted hits for certifications of these drawings. some are purchased by organizations and various agencies. they are hitting civilians whether it is just electromagnetic or i pray that they are not killing innocent citizens. this is a question here. 30,000 additional drones to be released, tested, and evaluated over the united states? i think america needs to wake up. 30,000 additional draws while we have homelessness, veterans returning, you can put that kind of money over the united states of america. there are too many directives out there and contractors who are now using these devices targeting citizens as we si
. there are new claims of a responsibility for a terrorist attack on the u.s. embassy in turkey. we know about the group and how they fit into the wider global terror network. >> the white house on defense over defense secretary nominee chuck hagel's explosive and contentious senate hearing. what are the chances that he'll get confirmed. >>> the dow closing above 14,000 for the very first time in years. will it continue? that's the big question. >>> but up first some brand new developments this out of alabama. that's where a 5-year-old boy remains hostage in an underground bunker. at this hour authorities sent a special message to the man holding him there, jimmy lee dykes. the standoff began five days ago when police say dykes kidnapped the boy from his school bus after shooting the driver. jonathan serrie is live at the scene in midland city, alabama. what's the latest? >> reporter: no resolution as the hostage standoff goes into a fifth afternoon. however, authorities say they are in constant communication with 65-year-old jimmy lee dykes communicating through the pvc pipe that provides ven
the memories of their fallen brothers, and to help us to remember why this country remains strong and free. how so few americans prevailed against so many, as to prepare for the citation, i will leave you with the words of clinton himself. because they say something about the army and something about america. they say something about our spirit, which will never be broken. "we were not going to be beaten that day. we will not back down in the face of diversity like that -- adversity like that. we're just going to win, plain and simple." god bless you, clinton romesha, and all of your team. god bless all who serve, and god bless the united states of america. with that, i would like the citation to be ready. >> the president of the united states of america, authorized by act of congress, march 3, 1963, has awarded in the name of congress the medal of honor to staff sergeant clinton romesha, u.s. army, force -- for conspicuous gallantry and intricately above and beyond the call of duty. clinton romesha this in which and self at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving i
to say a word about the councils africa center for the benefit of the audience, those who are new to us were joining us for the first time via television or the internet. the africa center was established in september, 2009, with a mission to help transform u.s. and other healthy approaches to africa by emphasizing the building of strong geopolitical partnerships with african states and strengthening economic growth and prosperity on the continent. the center seeks to engage and inform with policymakers in the general public of the strategic importance of effort that. both globally and for american and european interest in particular. a subject which obviously -- a commitment you share by joining us today. of strategic importance. we do this for -- a robust media presence. we worked promote constructive us leadership and engagement in international affairs is done the central role of the atlantic community in meeting international challenges. the africa center supports and collaborates with product -- public and private sectors, giving practical solutions to the challenges in africa. on
of the fact that was used to talk about the king is the fact that he was preventing people from coming to the country and being able to migrate here kyl and then if we look at the statue of liberty to give me your tired in your poor what i don't want people to take away from this hearing is all of a sudden we forgot about the tide of the poor and the people that are striving for a better life, so those are probably my biggest concerns when we what that he the president we sat and we have economic problems and we are getting out of them like we always do we and we will always prospered because we are resilient. but the question becomes what about the moral ground that we would see if we just said we are going to get about 11 million people and we are only going to focus on skilled workers we are not going to take care of this house and equal protection do you worry about that? >> i do. the fifth thing is our country is in a mess. we have a brain drain but not for the first time in history. it's never happened before. america has been a land. it is happening right now. if we wait to fix
also have to use the other policy tools in the european social fund. we need to invest to create jobs in europe. and reallocate some social funds to young people. growth and jobs are the guarantee for young people in europe. we need to work together to underscore the legitimacy of the european national parliament. we are deciding together on these issues. we need to cooperate with the national parliament and show what this group can do for the democracy. >> thank you, mr. president. president of the republic, france is a normal country in europe, but not an ordinary one. and in this time of uncertainty, europe is looking to france for two things. it needs to be exemplary at home, meeting the commitments it has made, working in a harmonious way in the european collective, and we are grateful that you up been trying to do that. there are some strange dissonances and europe is surprised to hear these. france is reducing its retirement age as europe gets older. everyone is trying to stop money being misused and promote growth to create new jobs and france is now punishing those people who
you all for joining us here today and thank you all who joined us. [applause] >> in a few moments, secretary of state john kerry gives an address at the university of virginia. in an hour, a defense -- department of defense briefing on sequestration. after that, it review of the 2012 presidential campaign with strategists from president obama and mitt romney. secretary of state john kerry is calling on congress not to make senseless reductions in foreign aid to automatic spending cuts scheduled to begin march 1. the secretary spoke at the university of virginia in charlottesville. he was introduced by virginia senator tim kaine. this is an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you so much. hello, uva. it is great to be back on the grounds. i want to say to president sullivan what a treat it is to be here with you. thank you for hosting this great occasion. to my friend robert hurt, served with him in state government and now we travel to washington together. i look forward to good work together, especially if on this occasion to introduce secretary kerry and to introduce
>> let's talk about recent comments in canada, the u.s. ambassador to canada and find that more action by canada on climate change might make it easier for the president to approve keystone. how did you interpret those comments? >> i think it was another opportunity to talk about what we are doing. i believe for the president and for canada, it is both. you can actually improve energy security and in our neighborhood of north america and with vehicle emissions standards, coal plants standards, you will eventually see that in the united states. nobody is replacing a coal plant with coal again. they are replacing it with natural gas. it reduces emissions by 50%. i did not see that as a quid pro quo. when the secretary of state and our minister of foreign affairs met and had a press conference, they talked about both climate change and energy security. we talked about vehicle emissions standards. th minister talked about the action we've taken had the the united states on coal plants in canada. i closed down some coal plants. i thought it was good for our jurisdiction but i think e
's it for us. thanks for watching. "erin burnett out front" starts now. >> a suicide bomber stages a deadly strike on an american embassy and this time the white house quick to label it a terrorist attack. >>> plus, a prosecutor gunned down on the way to work. friend says he believes he was in serious danger. was it revenge for doing his job? >>> and guns and politics. did joe biden slip of the tongue just wreck the president's message on guns? let's go out front. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. american embassy attacked. a suicide bomber struck at a security checkpoint at the american embassy in turkey today, and this time the white house immediately labeled it an act of terror. >> a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is by definition an act of terror, a terrorist attack. however, we do not know at this point who is responsible or the motivations behind the attack. the attack itself is clearly an act of terror. >> an act of terror regardless of who is responsible or what their motivations are. more on that in a moment, but first, chris lawrence at the pentagon. ch
will use super bowl sunday to talk about government regulations when it comes to the issue of steroids or head injuries. the phone lines are open. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines courtesy of the museum. from "the san francisco chronicle" -- from "the baltimore sun" -- let's turn to the politics and policy behind the nfl. this is a story a few days ago from "the washington post." outlining a plan and a letter to the executive director of the players union. they agreed as part of a 2011 collective bargaining agreement that the players should be tested for hgh, but the two sides of that agreed. two seasons have been played without it. last weekend in new orleans, roger goodell was asked a number of questions including one on the issue of head injuries. here is more from last week. [video clip] >> i welcome the president's comments. we want to make sure people understand what we are doing to make our game safer, not just in the nfl but throughout sports. the changes we are making a in the nfl are changing all of sports. it is a better recognition of head injuries. of treat
armed service committee. this should begin in a second. let us watch. we will cavill and to hear from defense secretary leon panetta and general martin dempsey about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi that resulted in the death of four americans. one week ago today, this committee heard from senator chuck hegel -- hagel to be the next defense secretary. the center of south carolina said he would put a hold on former senator hagel's nomination unless leon panetta agreed to testify. this is the first of two harris we will show you today. this and later this afternoon, the confirmation hearing for cia director nominee, john brennan, currently the counter-terrorism chief. >> good morning, everybody. we welcome secretary of defense leon panetta and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff general martin dempsey to testify about the department of defense's response to the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya on september 11 and all of last year. the findings of its review following that attack, including lessons learned. i want to remi
that. but in any event, it's the group using the one and half million cell phones but it's the group watching the south korean soap operas but it's the group that is becoming the information consumers of north korea who are desperate for more information or salivating, the chairman of google was visiting because they are thinking that the opportunities for their closed system internet. and then there's all the north koreans a sickly, the rest of north korea, most of north korea, where just puncturing the bubble of censure, of censorship that exist in north korea with what north korea really spends on defense, what it spends on its missile programs. i've always equated it to the lesson of development including the local aid budget upon the village schoolhouse door so villagers would know if the village elders were stealing the money. that was intended for the schoolhouse. i think we can through basic information in this age that more and more north koreans know about the human rights record. north korean database that's now a permanent growing database now, five, six years running bec
out of it and we don't solve any problem and gave politics are just as bad for us in the next 10 years. >> quite frankly don't trust congress so if congress can't make the contracts, the first thing that will come down is who will be high-skilled or -- if the was enforcement only and they said oh yeah by the way we are definitely going to do a low-skilled thing of future and do high-skilled i wouldn't support the enforcement only because i don't trust them. i think they will stop after stop after that about this over the last couple of years when they did these peaceful approach is a lot of them failed. the immigration act that moved the countries of origin toward a green card, greenlaw stopped in the house. had stopped after it passed in the house. unfortunately there is a political strategy going on now. i personally think it only matters if it's if it's a road to an and i think that's always going the way it's going now. >> without, thank you all for coming. there will be orders for drinks in the lobbies if you want to come back. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conve
political parties and civic groups because at least in theory parties are more accountable and tend to use their money to help challenges and are less inclined to support extremist, which is no small matter in today's polarized environment. here we go. thank you. here are some trends i see and how citizen as united plays into them. it did not cause them but it greases the wheels, especially since 2000 to when congress passed the bi-partisan campaign reform act. there is a redistribution of money away from can't attend -- candidates and toward groups. candidates are chiefly responsible but more is spent by others and for a while was political parties but it is non-party groups and citizens united cracked up this dynamic. -- ratches up this dynamic. there are strong incentives for collective action by partisans. national politics today is about high-stakes elections. both parties have a chance to control government and have very different views about what should be done. because of this, parses want to organize and coordinate but campaign finance laws but restraint of that. the laws were de
government is tied to a large number of cyber attacks on the u.s.. if the administration released a report that it will consider fines and other trade actions against china or any other country guilty of cyber espionage. we will continue to follow that story and bring you any remarks that may come out from administration officials today. the supreme court is expected to hear arguments in late march in two prominent cases that could test the bounds of laws restricting gay marriage. authors of "recently released book some day marriage recently debated the issue at harvard university. it is and about how to by the federalist society at harvard. this is one hour. >> thank you. richard fallon is the junior professor of constitutional law at harvard law school. he also earned a ba degree from oxford university, where he was a rhodes scholar. he served as a law clerk to justices of the united states supreme court and has written extensively about constitutional and federal courts law. he is the author of several books. we are very grateful for him for participating. andrew koppelman is the john p
entities use? >> there is no reason why they shouldn't be treated just a couple of reasons why. if you buy locally now, you probably pay five times what we would pay with an order of three or 4 million units of whatever. so, i think yeah, we will have failed if we don't build this cheaper than you could build it. >> finally, as we are building this, they're still will be the extensive expenses the states and governments have to come up with the dollars for to be able to build out their own interoperable communications with their first responders. so i hope that there is some accommodation and if we are going to control this, our spectrum within the low point in the states i hope he will also give us the capacity to possibly work out the leases that give us the of devotee and also to raise some dollars until local level so that we can buy and invest. >> the question is for the individual negotiating with at&t or sprint or verizon or could we cut a better deal nationwide? whichever way it goes, you want those savings back into the pricing structure. >> which then goes back to the governor me
sponsored by the u.s. postal service, he was in essence defrauding the government because the postal service requires everybody who works for it not to use any illegal drugs, and armstrong, landis claims, was, in fact, blood doping and using hormones chshgs are both forbidden by the fewer defrance and they claim by the postal service itself. it's a civil lawsuit claiming that he cheated the government and, of course, the u.s. postal service paid millions of dollars to sponsor the tour de france teams on which lance armstrong raced and, of course, won. now, metro detroit landis has already admitted cheating, but he says in the lawsuit that's how he knew what lance armstrong was up to. now, it's not a slam dunk, andrea, because, first of all, there's a question of how long ago this happened and whether you can still sue over it now. there's also a question of whether armstrong explicitly signed a contract with the postal service which would have forbidden him to do it, or whether it was a more general contract. his lawyers also say that they tried for weeks to settle this or work a resolution
using putting more and more on the backs of individuals. we've heard story after story this morning where there is irrational use in the delivery system because of the fragmentation that we have and we have seen through the payment reform that we have done that setting the right payment incentives in place actually does help rationalize the system and start to net the fabric together between the primary care and specialty care and we actually have hospitals that start to understand what their place in the reform system is there a cost center not a revenue center and they have to actually become smaller over time for the system to become sustainable, so to me, you know, to focus our attention on the individuals in the public and beneficiaries and how we are right to change their benefits to make all of this work seems like a full of air and when the real problem is the way that we have structured the incentive on the delivery system side and fixing that we can get a long range towards addressing affordability and quality. >> we have time for a question or two from the audience. if yo
on the climate change front, this might help us. canadian politicians are running around now that there is greenhouse gas admission in the air. they are going to great length to point that out. who is a real climate laggard if the u.s. is not serious on getting on this. >> that is the point. language is important. it can be a real problem. that relativity will be pointed to. given the breath of things, the things that we need to do together and the issues we need to tackle together has a common view. that ranges from foreign affairs to our common economic future. it would be unhelpful if this was more than just a bump in the road that became something that pushed us off the road. >> i think danielle wanted to jump in. before that, i get a sense of your questions in the audience. i see some hands. ok. if you change your mind and more hands went to ask, i will get to that depending on how much time is reserved. >> the decision around the keystone is not necessarily lateral. who will be point our finger at if the president makes a decision we do not like? canada has played a rol
a student in college. and his sisters were here with us today as well, domonique, shakeyta and rhunetta are attending the preparatory school of d.c. and are on similar path to opportunity. i visited his school yesterday and it isn't amazing. it is making a real difference in the lives of kids who, without that school, could possibly be lost. and this is what is at stake. because now they have great teachers, terrific administered, small class sizes and a mission that said every kid has got to succeed. now, no one should deny rashawn or his sisters this opportunity. [applause] >> joseph kelley nor any parent should have to wait for failed education systems, failed school systems to get their acts together. throughout the country there are some promising signs that we can bring schools and parents together to improve our educational system. san francisco public schools adopted a funding mechanism according to what's termed a weighted student formula. under this policy the more students a school attracts, the more money that school, its administrators and teachers receive. low-income stude
a rental car. i could also use an umbrella. fall in love with progressive's claims service. >>> i'm toure. today, stunning news from the vatican. i wonder if god was surprised to learn pope benedict is stepping down. >>> i'm s.e. cupp. millions of americans captivated by the search of a successor. the picking a new pontiff. >>> i'm steve kornacki. president obama has tossed out the old olive branch. coming up, a man who himself helped write four state of the union addresses explains who us how it takes shape. >>> i'm krysa tal. should the president go big by thinking small? it's monday and you're in "the cycle." >>> after having repeatedly examined my conscience before god, i have come to the certainty that my strengths due to an advanced age are no longer suited to an adequate exercise of the petrine ministry and the pope abdicated with only eight years on st. peter's throne shocking the 1 billion catholic faithful around the world. the's not a papal abdication in more than 700 years and surprised the close est adviser today. he's a theological conservative with strong positions against
of this committee is one that is very proud to work together. i'm happy that you are here with us to help move that tradition forward at a greater and deeper rate. we deeply appreciate it. less than two miles from where we sit today at the entrance of u.s. treasury building that is a large, bronze statue. one would assume that the figure is alexander hamilton. america's first treasury secretary. look again. this 12 foot tall statue is of albert gallatin. the longest serving u.s. treasury. in a to one, thomas jefferson asked gallatin to serve. --in 1801, thomas jefferson asked gallatin to serve here in the place of treasury secretary is more than avarice and response will -- laborous and responsible than any other. what did he do? he established fiscal discipline that was necessary a country into a great world power. gallatin also help orchestrate the louisiana purchase, doubling the size of the united states. his work is commemorated in gallatin county, montana and a beautiful gallatin national forest in the rockies as well as the gallatin river in missouri. when gallatin accepted the decision
armstrong. now the u.s. government is on his case. and one week left medical the budget ax falls. today it is transportation secretary ray la hood's turn to warn about the sec kwster's deep impact. >> this is going to happen sfwloosh clarify why -- it's the matter of mileage between -- >> because we're going to reduce the number of controllers which will reduce their ability to guide planes in and out of airports. >> republicans say that's just scare tactics. >> the president is making stuff up. he puts law enforcement -- he puts firemen and policemen who 98% of them are being paid for with your local taxes and says you're going to lose your local policeman because of this. it's not true. >> and countdown to the oscars. we'll talk to the man behind the mom natured documentary five broken cameras about the conflict in the west bank. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington where we have breaking news from the justice department now, which is joining a lawsuit by a former teammate against lance armstrong. nbc justice correspondent pete williams jones me now from the newsroom. h
their creator had given all of us. to make decisions for good or bad and normally to have to live with the consequences -- consequences of those decisions. the global jihadist threat that secretary clinton pointed out does not have the belief that a democracy is a good idea. that a people electing representatives in a republican form of government is a good idea. they believed that we need some religious leader like the ayatollah khomeini or now in iran. they need a religious leader like that that tells us what we can do, that makes all his decisions under shari'a law. . all of those who met during the revolution, they believed in the power of prayer to god, and that's why they prayed during that time, but they wanted much to have the chance to worship as they chose. be they muslim, hindu. but especially judeo-christian beliefs where jews and christians had traditionally suffered so much persecution. they wanted the chance for people to worship as they please or not worship, but they knew to make that possible had he had to -- they had to pray to god. that's why we are observing o
investors and ben white, chief economic correspondent at politico. also here with us is david joy. it's great to have all you guys here. phil, why has the rally stalled? >> well, we've gotten out of the gate in terrific shape here. the stock market, the s&p is up about 6% the first six weeks or so of the year. we've got a very constructive full year forecast of 1660 on the s&p, which would be a record high. but we didn't think we were going to go straight there. the reality is that we've had a terrific run. the markets are a little bit tired. you've got some washington-related news coming up over the next month or so. we would expect that this would be a perfect opportunity for, you know, a 3% to 5% pause. and i think we're starting to see that reflected -- >> up to 5% is almost the whole thing. >> well, look, a week from now, president obama is going to do his state of the union address, okay? typically the market doesn't respond well when the president talks. then we're going to start to get into some of the nitty-gritty, some of the spending issues. that would be a perfect opportun
and the use of contraceptives. the last day in the vatican is february 28th. the college of cardinals meets in conclave mid-march to elect a successor. the pope will not participate. there's you are surgency to hav pope seated before the holy week. we start with claudio in vatican city. when's the latest? >> reporter: hi, toure. now the countdown is finally started, of course. well, there's no -- usually people don't have the chance to see the -- to know when the end of an end happens because in the past the pope had to die before a new pope could be voted in. this time, we have a date. 28th of february and we got a lot of reaction to the announcement of pope benedict xvi that he is resigning. first of all, look at how he -- well, he abdicated rather than resigning. let's see how. he did that during a low-key affair this morning the vatican meeting with cardinals. wasn't a big deal and he said -- his speech made it in latin. not italian or english or a comprehensible language to most people and it was down to somebody from a local press office, local wire agency to actually figure out that
and innovation, the highest honors bestowed by the u.s. government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. you will have it for you later in our program schedule. at the white house, jay carney held his daily briefing, addressing a number of issues including a bombing at the u.s. embassy in turkey today. >> does the president considered the attack on our embassy in turkey to be a terrorist attack? >> that is an excellent question a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is by definition an act of terror, a terrorist attack. i think this is an incident that has just occurred and i don't want to get ahead of it, is being investigated. we strongly condemn what was a suicide attack against our embassy in ankara, which took place at the embassy's our security perimeter. details are still emerging about what exactly happened, who was responsible. it is clearly an act of terror. it caused -- cost hte life about least one individual, a turkish security guard. we are working with the turkish authorities to investigate the incident and bring the perpetrators to justice. our thoughts and prayers
to use that as a bargaining chip again. we saw how damaging bringing into question the credit worthyness of the government. the fight should not be should we pay the bill? >> there is an interesting question about in retrospect if republicans leveraging the debt limit to get a bill that cut spending by $1 to $2 trillion going forward whether that was worth it? they introduced liquidity risk. if you don't cut spending we're not going to vote for a debt limit increase. it worked. the president agreed to cut the spending by a significant amount. now, would you like that negotiation had resulted from not having made that threat? absolutely. but do you think it would have occurred? there's the difference. i would never be one to advocate that congress should not increase the debt limit. they should. when this came up in the summer of 2011 i wrote that and they put that in the pages of "the initial review." i was arguing against those who say let's look and creating a cash crunch. that is the wrong thing to do. congress has the ability to decide what they want to attach to the legislation. tha
. thank you for being with us on the "washington journal." the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., february 14, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable chris collins to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 3, 2013, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each, but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. mullen, for five minutes. -- mr. mullin, for five minutes. mr. mullin: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house and to revise and extend. the speaker pro te
with normal video and this is me being shot with the eight millimeter application. the death tore showed us frame by frame where he used the app. one example, this aerial sequence. >> this is actually out of a flight window. it looks like real film. you can't tell the difference. >> reporter: he told us he also used the app to shoot video off a computer screen. his purpose was to get that '70s feel, the time when rodriguez, his subject, was actively making music. >> i filmed this with regular film, and i shot the computer screen, like that, so i got the super eight feeling. >> reporter: tracking down the creator of the app proved a challenge. we eventually located him in northeastern china where he was visiting. by skype he shared his reaction to finding out his app was used in an oscar nominated film. >> it's crazy. we are pretty thrilled. >> reporter: hearing about his app's connection to the film inspired him to watch "searching for sugar man." >> what did you think? >> it's quite a touching film. >> reporter: hong is a fan of the movie by beng lou is a fan of the app. nischelle turner,
. if i were to walk outside my home and go down the street and used it for any purpose, i would face one year in jail and $1,00a while ago was speaking out about getting guns across state lines. i know he probably doesn't deserve one, but how does he protect himself? you said a convicted felon should not have a gun, ever. host: we have a lot on the table, what is your response to the coat caller? guest: i was just saying that as a society, convicted felons lose their constitutional right to bear arms. i just don't see that changing. it is hard pressed to know what is in the heart of a convicted felon. it is about decisions and the consequences to it. to clarify what i said about children, lots of families take their kids to the range early. they also teach them to hunt early. not encouraging families, i just don't think you should keep guns a secret. i think by doing that, you keep a curiosity. keep your gun locked up, explained to them the basic safety. point in a safe direction. if they get curious or break into your safe, they will have all the safety things in place. ownerson the gun
correspondent ali velshi is here in "the situation room" with us today. ali -- >> what a day. >> -- the numbers are going up. >> just flat, basically. we came within 16 points of the record that was set on october the 9th in 2007. so if we got there, you would have just made your money back after more than five years. let me just remind you, in a market that is volatile, which means a lot of computers influence trade trading, you will go down. this will take a few days. for everything else going on in the economy and in washington, this dow is near an all-time high. we got to a fire-year high again today. >> it doesn't look like on wall street at least, this concern about forced spending cuts. >> there's a couple of reasons for that. as you know, let's say the forced spending cuts go into effect on saturday morning. up won't see any of the furloughs or layoffs for another month and that's when we have to discuss the budget. so the market thinks you have the end of march, not february. the stock is overvalued. you pay a multiple of that. in a low-interest rate environment, you tend to take a ris
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